Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful

One empowered woman's struggle against the world
Friday January 17th 2020

Safety Tips

Whether you already have a trusted family pet or are just introducing a pet to your children it is always important to remember that pets are animals. Therefore, all children need to learn some basic safety tips to ensure the safety of them and the pet. Below are some good tips that will help child and pet play well together and hopefully build a long lasting bond.

General Rules

  • Limit the physical interaction between the children and the pet in the beginning. Get pet toys that the children can use to play with the pet instead. Once the children and pet have built a relationship introducing more physical contact and play. Always watch how the pet reacts, it is a good indicator of when the pet is ready for more. Children and pets can rile each other up and good clean fun can quickly turn into danger. This is also a good way for your child and your pet to learn verbal commands.
  • Teaching a pet to respond to verbal cues doesn’t work with every pet. I doubt you will ever get the hamster or guinea pig to obey but dogs can be trained. I have been a cat owner for many years and I have yet to get a cat to respond to verbal commands but give it try if you think you can. Involve your children in training the pet this way both child and pet know what the proper verbal cues and commands are to ensure consistency.
  • Children like to teach pets to do tricks or play games with them. It is very important for children to know the limitations of animals. Make sure your child understands that it is an animal and not another person they are playing. This also applies to your pet. While it might be ok for puppies to nip each other during play it is not ok when it is a child they are playing with. Pets and children alike can be taught how to play safely.

Physical Safety

  • You want both the child and pet to be safe from each other during periods of stress or anger or when they just want to be left alone. Your children should already known that their pet is an animal and has limitations. Now you can teach your children how to recognize when their pet wants to be left alone. Pets have pretty consistent body language when they want to be left alone. Some pets have verbal cues as well but the physical ones are the easiest to recognize. When you see the signs the pet is giving off take the time to show your child so they too can recognize them. It is important not to corner pets as they can and will act aggressively, it is instinct to protect themselves just as humans do
  • One of the first commands you need to teach your pet is stop. It is a pretty universal commands that works on most trained pets. Teaching your child to use stop and use it with a strong tone will help ensure compliance and minimize any unwanted mishaps.
  • Teach your child how to protect themselves if attacked or if the pet gets over excited. The basics of rolling into the fetal position, covering their face and calling for help will go along way. Running away can sometimes make the pet think your child is still playing and will give chase and possibly tackle them depending on the size of your pet.
  • One of the most important is to teach your child that their pet is unique to them. Children need to learn that what is ok to do with their own pet might not be ok to do with a friend or stranger’s pet. Always ask before interacting with someone else’s pet.

Toy Safety

  • Don’t let your pet play with your child’s toys—they may not be pet-safe. The reverse is also true.
  • Don’t give your child balloons to play with around your pet, and don’t give your pet balloons to play with. Your pet may be frightened by the noise of a popping balloon and could choke on one if chewed. A child can burst a balloon and choke should she try to imitate the way a pet uses his teeth.
  • On a regular basis clean your child’s and your pet’s toys. The germs that build up on these toys could make both your child and your pet sick.

Food Safety

  • Teach your children to stay away from their pet when the pet is eating. Pets can get very aggressive over food. The reverse is also true.
  • Make sure your children are aware that pets have specific diets and can’t always eat the same foods as the children. For example chocolate can be very toxic to dogs but we all know the children can eat it by the truck load and its only mommy who ends up with a headache. Giving inappropriate food to a pet can even cause it to die so it is very important children let the pets stick to pet food designed for them.

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