Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful
Thanksgiving Football shopping pumpkin pie fall leaves turkey dinner Family pilgrims blessings cornucopia peace love thankful

One empowered woman's struggle against the world
Saturday November 25th 2017

About Men

Mom vs. the “Ex” Men

The end of any relationship often raises issues, emotionally and problematically; but when children are involved the ones that get most hurt are them.

In this section, you’ll find many resources and advice to aid you in dealing with your ex that will hopefully lead to a worthwhile relationship that your children cherish – it doesn’t have to be a war!

First off – some advice to set the tone:

Avoiding an Argument Dealing with Your Ex

So what are some of the techniques for getting along with your difficult ex?

One of the basic premises of conflict management is stepping away from an argument. (We hate it when somebody points this out to us, but it really does take two to make an argument.) Defusing an angry verbal assault will help you reduce your own stress level appreciably.

When your spouse or ex begins ranting about your shortcomings as well as those of your children, his or her boss, your mother, the bank, car mechanic, or the world in general, you instinctively feel defensive. You want to set the record straight, and your adrenaline surge makes you want to fight. The result is a pointless shouting match which only ratchets up the mutual level of anger.

Instead try this technique: look him or her in the eye and listen, but don’t react. Acknowledge what is being said (or shouted) with replies like:

“I can hear you’re angry.” or “I can see you’re upset.” This acknowledges their right to an opinion, and says that you’re listening rather than tuning out. It doesn’t indicate agreement or disagreement.

A slight variation that accomplishes the same purpose is called mirroring in which you simply reflect back what they’ve said:

“You’re saying you feel frustrated with the visitation schedule.” or “You feel I don’t keep you up to date on the kids.”

With either of these approaches, it’s important to avoid loaded language. Resist the temptation to use sarcasm or supposedly innocent emotional jabs. Also avoid using the words “ever” and “never.” They can be even more infuriating than shouting and your objective is to de-escalate the heat of the exchange.

Notice, you’re not saying you agree or disagree. All you’re doing is acknowledging that you hear what the other person is saying. These techniques will let you accomplish two things:

  1. When you refuse to get into an argument, therapists say you’re not picking up the rope (as you would in a tug of war). By the same token, if you stop arguing back, they say you’ve let go of the rope. Either way the argument can’t escalate if you can stay relatively calm and firm.
  2. The other thing is that some people just love to fish you in and push your hot buttons until they can get you to say something dumb. Then they light into you for that. If you remain neutral, you won’t give them any ammunition.

After such an encounter, you may need to go for a long walk, work out at the gym, or gripe to a friend to relieve the stress. But you’ll feel far more rational and in control than if you’d joined in the yelling match!

Dealing with the Ex: The Dos and Don’ts:

Keep in mind:

1) That the “high road” is always a good choice.

2) Ninety percent of the emotion associated with a conflict-laden exchange with your Ex stems from the history (yours, theirs, and your shared history) rather than the event itself.

3) Conflicted incidents with your Ex actually trigger thoughts that produce your negative emotions, which, in turn, lead to your making a negative response. This sets the stage for more negativity in any subsequent interactions with them. You can choose to substitute a negative-emotion-inducing thought with a more productive thought.

4) Anger is the most frequently cited feeling associated with conflict-laden exchanges with the Ex. However, anger usually masks a more specific and accurate feeling.

5) If you are feeling “controlled” or “suffocated”, chances are that you are acting in irresponsible ways.

6) If you are feeling “overwhelmed” and “unappreciated”, chances are that you have been overly responsible in your actions.

To find out who owns the problem, sort out:

1) What, precisely, is the problem?

2) Who is having a negative reaction to it? If it is you, ask yourself: “What thoughts are provoking these feelings? Change the thought(s) if necessary.

3) Who brought the issue up?

4) Who is responsible for the solution? Usually, the person who brought up the issue is the one who “owns” the problem and needs to do something about it.

5) Ask yourself: “Is this a big deal?” If not, don’t sweat the small stuff.

When an issue needs to be addressed dealing with your Ex:

1) Book a time with them to address it.

2) Keep it to one issue at a time.

3) Use a neutral location.

4) Be clear, ahead of time, regarding your feelings concerning the issue.

5) Know why you are feeling the way that you are.

6) Be clear on what you want them to do differently.

7) Be able to state, in a positive way, what you want them to do differently (e.g., I want you to leave earlier so you will be on time to pick up the kids.) rather than in a negative way. (e.g., Stop being late.)

8) Avoid using “never” and “always” as in: “You’re never on time”.

9) Keep your voice tone in check.

10) Have an “out” prepared. For example, “We’ll have to keep this brief because I have to pick up the kids in five minutes.”

11) Have enforceable consequences (for non-compliance) identified before hand. Ensure that you can follow through, and will follow through with any consequences you decide to impose.

12) Use an “I message” that is formulated to include the following four parts:

1) The action that gives you concern

2) The way you feel about that action

3) Why you feel the way you do about the action, and

4) A statement of the desired action.

[If you are addressing a female, put the “feeling” segment at the start of the “I message”. If you are addressing a male, state the “desired action” first.]

If the discussion is simply not moving forward, it may be necessary to “be a broken record” and reiterate the desired behavior several times during the discussion. The goal here is to get the focus clearly on a particular point, not to inflame the situation. So your tone of voice should convey your clarity of focus. Do not use this strategy in a situation that is becoming hostile or in a situation where aggression may erupt.

If the exchange provokes hostility:

1) acknowledge their reaction (e.g., I can hear your displeasure in the tone of your voice.),

2) assert that further discussion is necessary,

3) propose another time when you can reconvene to discuss the issue, and

4) leave.

If your Ex indicates they have no intention to comply, or they fail to change their behavior in the way you have requested, put your consequences in place—and stick to them. If you fail to stick to them, you can be sure that they will be more difficult to deal with the next time—and there will be a next time.

As a general rule, don’t agree to any revisions or changes of plan without first “touching base” with your partner. For example, say: “Before I can give you the ‘OK’ on that, I’ll need to make sure that it won’t conflict with any existing commitments. I’ll get back to you later today, or tomorrow to let you know for sure.” Don’t ‘hang the blame’ on your partner. Your Ex needs to know that you have a backbone.

Don’t be stampeded. If your Ex is demanding an answer ‘right now’, say: “If you have to have an answer right now, it’ll have to be ‘No’. However, if you can hold off until I can see how things are shaping up, my answer might be ‘Yes’.

If communication through verbal means is too emotionally charged, try written or electronic communication.

If you absolutely cannot talk wit your Ex, find a neutral third party to exchange information.

Children are not a neutral third party.

Mom vs. the World

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